LEGO explains why the UCS Venator doesn’t have an interior

75367 Venator-Class Republic Attack Cruiser has size and scale on its side, but it’s still lacking an interior. The LEGO Star Wars design team explains why the UCS set is all about what’s on the outside…

If there’s a criticism to be levelled at 75367 Venator-Class Republic Attack Cruiser (and maybe there isn’t), it’s that the designers have not taken advantage of the space beneath its outer shell to add any semblance of an interior to the flagship cruiser. It’s arguably one of the major ways in which it might have improved on its closest predecessor, 75252 Imperial Star Destroyer. But according to the set’s designers, there are several reasons why that opportunity hasn’t been seized.

“If you build it, or if you just go to a mall and lift up the upper hull plates, [you’ll see] there’s quite a lot of space inside, right?” LEGO designer Hans Burkhard Schlömer tells Brick Fanatics and other LEGO Fan Media. “So let’s fill it with cool stuff. But we quickly realised that it’s mostly an illusion, especially in the front. The hull plates are very close together, even if you’re just looking at the outer hull plates, and there are layers of plates. To be honest, there’s no room in the front.”

Those lucky enough to have already put the model together (or at least glimpsed it in person) will know that the further back in the hull you go, the more space opens up between the hull plates. That’s space that could conceivably have allowed for some kind of interior – even at microscale. But there were other obstacles preventing the designers from popping one in, like the fact the set already clocks in at 5,374 pieces for £559.99 / $649.99 / €649.99.

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“I have seen models with an interior,” Hans adds. “But if you start adding an interior, the piece count goes up dramatically. We’re not just talking about a handful of pieces. We’re talking about hundreds of pieces. I think there’s one fan model almost the same size, it has part of an interior in the hangar area, and I think it has like 12,000 pieces. That’s more than double this. So once we start adding stuff, yeah, it gets really piece intensive.”

There was one other major hurdle in the way of adding an interior: one of practicality, logistics and the bottom line for any LEGO set, which is of course the building experience.

“Especially on a larger model, something that we have to consider when we’re designing is not just the stability and what fits in the model, but also what’s possible while building,” explains LEGO graphic designer Madison O’Neil. “When we show something in building instructions we show it as it would be built flat on a table, because that’s what works to communicate it, and that’s what works for builders. 

“Oftentimes there are challenges where you think, ‘Oh, you could fit something there,’ but then the build flow to actually get it there just doesn’t exist or it’s quite challenging to find a way. We make these compromises to ensure a positive building experience.”

If you do want to add an interior to your copy of 75367 Venator-Class Republic Attack Cruiser (given you may be less constrained by things like budget and build experience), there are plenty of ways to go about it. YouTuber SwiftBricks has already come up with one solution, which involves building an insertable interior separately and then simply sandwiching it into the space between the hull panels.

75367 Venator-Class Republic Attack Cruiser is available now at LEGO.com, and can currently be snapped up with double Insiders points (available until October 15) and up to three free gifts-with-purchase, including 40597 Scary Pirate Island (available until October 22), 40608 Halloween Fun VIP Add-On Pack (available until October 12) and 40562 Mystic Witch (in the UK and Europe only, while stocks last).

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Author Profile

Chris Wharfe
I like to think of myself as a journalist first, LEGO fan second, but we all know that’s not really the case. Journalism does run through my veins, though, like some kind of weird literary blood – the sort that will no doubt one day lead to a stress-induced heart malfunction. It’s like smoking, only worse. Thankfully, I get to write about LEGO until then.

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Chris Wharfe

I like to think of myself as a journalist first, LEGO fan second, but we all know that’s not really the case. Journalism does run through my veins, though, like some kind of weird literary blood – the sort that will no doubt one day lead to a stress-induced heart malfunction. It’s like smoking, only worse. Thankfully, I get to write about LEGO until then.

One thought on “LEGO explains why the UCS Venator doesn’t have an interior

  • 08/02/2024 at 22:22
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    can you ask Lego why the just make the set smaller?

    Reply

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